Health burden due to second-hand smoke exposure

This section estimates the health burden due to second-hand smoke in New Zealand, based on a recent study carried out by our team [1,2].

Second-hand smoke exposure accounted for 104 deaths in 2010

Second-hand smoke exposure was estimated to be responsible for 104 deaths in New Zealand in 2010 [1,2].

These deaths included an estimated:
- 65 deaths due to ischaemic heart disease (in non-smoking adults)
- 28 deaths due to stroke (in non-smoking adults)
- 5 deaths due to lung cancer (in non-smoking adults)
- 6 deaths due to sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) in children less than one year old.  

Children and Māori were disproportionately affected

In 2010, second-hand smoke exposure caused an estimated health loss of 1989 DALYs (disability-adjusted life years) in New Zealand. Children accounted for 30% of this loss.

In 2006, Māori experienced five times the health loss from second-hand smoke than non-Māori, after standardising for age.

For more information, read the journal article [1] or full report [2].

References

1. Mason KM, Borman B. 2016. The burden of disease from second-hand smoke exposure in New Zealand. New Zealand Medical Journal 129(1432): 16–25.

2.  Mason KM. 2016. The Burden of Disease from Second-hand Smoke in New Zealand. Wellington: Environmental Health Indicators Programme, Massey University.